vCloud Automation Center 6.0 and vCenter Orchestrator Advance Automation -Part03

Part1, Part2 are simple in some ways & parts. Next part is bit difficult to understand. At least it was for me. I will explain what I’m going to do at high level. I’ll get Machine Name. Then I will get Machine Property –> Machine Property will give me custom property ( VM Size which  user be selecting from drop down menu as referred here and Backup Selection referred here ) finally I will Invoke VCO workflow.  In this workflow which needs VM Name input and VM Size, Backup Choice as input – I will put VM Name which I get from Get Machine Name property and VM Size, Backup choice which I got from Get Machine Property


Now lets find where to do this and how to do this. Once you understand the basic concept it is way too simple. First open vCAC designer. In that first select load and then select “WFStubMachineProvisioned”. Why “WFStubMachineProvisioned”. Well, this workflow is called immediately when the status of VM is provisioned. More information is available in guide




In below screen double click on “Machine Provisioned


Scroll down till you find custom code and double click on the custom code


From left hand side “DynamicOps.Cdk.Activities” Drag “GetMachineName



I have defined two variable for this custom code

  1. vmname (to capture VM Name)
  2. VMSize (to capture VM size e.g. Large, Medium and Small in string format)
  3. VarBackupOption (To capture user selection Yes/No in string format)


Double click on GetMachineName


In Machine Id field put a pre-defined variable “VirtualMachineId”. This is standard value. Please do not change it. Under machine name put the variable vmname. This variable we have defined above.

Machine Name will pickup name from virtualmachineid and pass it to vmname. Finally variable vmname will hold the name of the vm. We are done with GetMachineName.

Click on the custom code as shown in above figure, it will take you back to custom code screen. Now from left hand side ”DynamicOps.Cdk.Activities” Drag “GetMachineProperty


GetMachineProperty reads the custom property you have defined and the value associated with that property in vCAC. In our case I have defined custom property with name VMSize and it’s value will come from value select from drop down menu. This value (e.g. Large, Medium or Small) will be taken by variable VMSize


You will notice VMSize property name is in Quotes however Property Value is without quotes. It is because VMSize in property value is variable which will be captured from user interaction in vCAC and VMSize in property name is coming from custom property defined in vCAC.

Conceptually this is how it is related



I repeated the same procedure for Backup choice and here is how it looks below


VarBackupOption will hold the user selection string value which would be either Yes or No and pass it to vCO workflow

Now we have Virtual machine name captured in VMName variable, VMSize captured in VMSize variable and BackupOption capture in VarBackupOption we are ready for next drag and drop Smile . Drag vCO workflow by name InvokeVcoWorkflow

Simply put VMName and VMSize as input to VCO workflow.



Now below is how entire workflow looks like


Now you are done with, simple Send and that updates the WFStubMachineProvisioned


This is all you need to do. Request Virtual Machine and you will get what you have configured.

Complete log of VM provisioning via vCAC and VCO is presented below with sequence of action.



vCloud Automation Center 6.0 and vCenter Orchestrator Advance Automation -Part02

If you have reached this post from Google, check this post first. That is where problem is discussed and this the second part of the solution. First thing you need is to pass three information from vCAC i.e. VM Name, Size of the VM and whether you need any backup. VM Name is parameter you will get from vCAC but for Backup Selection and VM Size selection I have created a custom property in build profile. Here is how I have created below

First go to infrastructure tab

In Infrastructure tab go to –> Blueprint –> Property Dictionary


Create a New Property Definition

Provide Name –VMSize

Display Name –Virtual Machine Size

Control Type – DropDownList

Please ensure Required check box is selected

Once done please click on green arrow.

Then click on Edit to edit Property Attributes


In the property attribute, select ValueList, Put same name “VM Sizes” and provide value as Large, Medium and Small which reflect the size of VM.


Similar exercise you follow for backup option

Here is how it looks when user selects the VM Size


For backup service selection this is how it looks below


Just ensure blueprint is updated as follows


This completes vCenter Automation Part at basic Level. Now comes the 3rd and final part. Follow third part here

vCloud Automation Center 6.0 and vCenter Orchestrator Advance Automation -Part01

This post is about extending vCAC in-built workflows. In last two post (Post1, Post2) I used vCenter Orchestrator (vCO) workflows and executed them using vCloud Automation Center’s (vCAC) advance service designer. It was like taking vCAC as front end to execute those workflows without taking any benefits of vCloud Automation Center’s product. vCAC was purely acting as front end.

Advance service designer doesn’t follow any reservation, policies configured for a particular tenant. It is purely taking inputs from whatever is configured in vCenter Orchestrator workflow and executing it. As I think of it is of help but then I miss all configuration, tracking ownership, multi-tenancy and metering in built in vCAC. In order to cover this I need to do additional scripting which is referred as day-2 operation. To cater this problem, vCAC provides you a way where you can modify in-built workflows. Basic details are provided into this document. I won’t repeat it here. But in order to understand this post you must read it.

To extend workflow you need vCAC designer. It is part of vCAC and can be downloaded from Install it. (it is next-next-next-Finish thing).

Problem Statement

User should be able to provision VM by selecting VM size within vCAC interface. Users should be able to understand what compute, storage details are provisioned when they select VM Size.

Here I’m going to modify my existing workflow which I created in post here. If you see the workflow there are three inputs needed

1. VM name

2. VM size

3. IP Address for the VM

If you review this post, 3rd point is automatically taken care. So I have to just focus on how to take two input (VM Name and VM Size) from vCAC and put in the vCO workflow. It was bit simple, just two inputs.

Cloning part will be taken care by vCAC but post provisioning task will be taken care by vCO workflow. So we need to only focus on creating a vCO workflow which will do the following

  1. Changing CPU count
  2. Change RAM
  3. Add Disk
  4. Add Backup Network if selected

If you execute this workflow from vCO or vCenter  VC:VirtualMachine as input is needed. But vCAC do not understand VC:VirtualMachine, it can only understand string input or can provide string output.  VC:VirtualMachine input is referred as complex object type. In order to deal with this input we need to put a wrapper around the workflow. How to put a wrapper around a workflow is explained by VCOTEAM.INFO. Thanks to this post. It is key post.

That post is a where you can start but that isn’t sufficient. You need more. If you refer below return type is array.


We need a VC:VirtualMachine as return type. I added script section and then I have created a new parameter with VC:VirtualMachine type with name as vm01 (referred in below screen)


In the first line of the script I converted array type i.e. Array/VC:VirtualMachine into VC:VirtualMachine and sent that as output. This is the core piece. If you understood this, you don’t need worry further. Everything else is straight forward. I thought so Winking smile

When I executed the VCO workflow from vCAC, it failed twice. First it failed with VMware tools not working and second time it failed with error “Hot add functionality” is disabled in VM.

First problem was when the provisioning activity was completed, my next workflow which was to shutdown the VM graceful was looking for VMware tools, it didn’t found vmware tools and abruptly failed. In order to shutdown VM gracefully VMware tools must be ready. So to address first problem I have to find a workflow which will check if VMware tools are ready. This can be easily checked by using “vim3WaitToolsStarted” action element. This workflow waits for VMware tools to be ready, as it is need to graceful shutdown VM.

Second problem was workflow didn’t wait for another workflow to be completed. After I shutdown VMs I have workflow which will change CPU count, then change RAM, Add Disk and finally powered ON the VM. So powered ON workflow didn’t wait to execute CPU count, Add Disk and RAM change workflow.  Therefore I use to get error about Hotplug not supported. It was like VM was started before even CPU and RAM change could be executed. So to solve this problem I added “vim3WaitTaskEnd” in-built workflow. This workflow checks previous tasks before executing next task.

With this additional work my final workflow was ready and shown below


NB: Except for the script section, everything in vCenter Orchestrator is in-built

Now next part is how to make vCAC to pick this VCO. I have discussed in next post here